Migration

Migration

Migration. We’ve all heard about it. It is one of the most current affairs within the news. It affects us all, consciously or subconsciously. We’ve all seen the heart wrenching photos in the news, of young children calling for their parents and of young adults holding their loved ones who have just drawn their last breath. Within the law it states that each person of the European Union has the freedom of movement which involves the right to move from country to country for up to 3 months or indefinitely if they’re employed or self-employed. Many are fleeing from the atrocious terrorism that is filling our world. This involves each member of the European Union as there are immigrants within our country who have had the privilege of this right. The government allowed these people into our country though are now trying to stop them from entering. David Cameron aims to provide resettlement for the immigrants. Migrants are able to escape conflict, however, before entering a country the migrant must prove that there is a war in their country which is very difficult. This prevents access for some that are in desperate need of help. 3,500 innocent people drowned whilst trying to escape the torturous surroundings they used to call home. More than 700,000 Syrian refugees and other migrants risked their lives this year to travel to Europe. 126,000 refugees are living in the UK. This effects our lives more than we know. They want our help, and the least we can do is help them. This has been going on for a long time but is only now reaching the news and Western media. According to a recent poll, 40% of British citizens say the UK should accept more refugees while 31% say the country should accept fewer. David Cameron must bear this in mind when he decides whether or not we stay in the EU. Many are just looking for clean water, sanitisation, facilities and food. Immigration laws are not the same in every EU country. This is because most EU countries have both EU laws and their own laws. Since 1999, the EU has been developing a common immigration policy for Europe. EU countries have agreed that the EU should have common or EU-wide immigration and visa rules that will be valid all across the EU in 27 countries. These are set out in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and include these common rules: entry and residence conditions for migrants, procedures for issuing long-term visas and residence permits, the rights of migrants living legally in an EU country, tackling irregular immigration and unauthorised residence, the fight against human trafficking, agreements on the re-admission of citizens returning to their own countries and incentives and support for EU countries to promote the integration of migrants.

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